Research

Papers

2011

  • F. M. Maggi, A. J. Mooij, and W. M. P. van der Aalst, “User-Guided Discovery of Declarative Process Models,” in 2011 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Data Mining, , 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{discovery,
    Author = {F.M. Maggi and A.J. Mooij and W.M.P. {van der Aalst}},
    Booktitle = {2011 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence and Data Mining},
    Date-Added = {2011-01-26 13:11:34 +0100},
    Date-Modified = {2011-02-10 00:18:08 +0100},
    Title = {{User-Guided Discovery of Declarative Process Models}},
    Year = {2011}
    }
  • F. M. Maggi, M. Westergaard, M. Montali, and W. M. P. van der Aalst, “Runtime Verification of LTL-Based Declarative Process Models,” in Proc. of RV, Springer-Verlag, 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{5values,
      Author = {F.M. Maggi and M. Westergaard and M. Montali and W.M.P. van der Aalst},
      Title = {{Runtime Verification of LTL-Based Declarative Process Models}},
      Year = {2011},
      Publisher = {Springer-Verlag},
      Series = {LNCS}, 
      Booktitle = {{Proc. of RV}}, 
    }
  • F. M. Maggi, M. Montali, M. Westergaard, and W. M. P. van der Aalst, “Monitoring Business Constraints with Linear Temporal Logic: An Approach Based on Colored Automata,” in Proc. of BPM, Springer-Verlag, 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{colored_automata,
      Author = {F.M. Maggi and M. Montali and M. Westergaard and W.M.P. van der Aalst},
      Title = {{Monitoring Business Constraints with Linear Temporal Logic: An Approach Based on Colored Automata}},
      Year = {2011},
      Publisher = {Springer-Verlag},
      Series = {LNCS}, 
      Booktitle = {{Proc. of BPM}}, 
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] M. Westergaard and F. Maggi, “Modeling and Verification of a Protocol for Operational Support Using Coloured Petri Nets,” in Applications and Theory of Petri Nets, L. Kristensen and L. Petrucci, Ed., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2011, vol. 6709, pp. 169-188.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{osprotocol,
       author = {Westergaard, Michael and Maggi, Fabrizio},
       affiliation = {Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands},
       title = {Modeling and Verification of a Protocol for Operational Support Using Coloured Petri Nets},
       booktitle = {Applications and Theory of Petri Nets},
       series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
       editor = {Kristensen, Lars and Petrucci, Laure},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
       isbn = {978-3-642-21833-0},
       keyword = {Computer Science},
       pages = {169-188},
       volume = {6709},
       doi = {10.1007/978-3-642-21834-7_10},
       note = {10.1007/978-3-642-21834-7_10},
       abstract = {In this paper, we describe the modeling and analysis of a protocol for operational support during workflow enactment. Operational support provides online replies to questions such as “is my execution valid?” and “how do I end the execution in the fastest/cheapest way?”, and may be invoked multiple times for each execution. Multiple applications (operational support providers) may be able to answer such questions, so a protocol supporting this should be able to handle multiple providers, maintain data between queries about the same execution, and discard information when it is no longer needed. We present a coloured Petri net model of a protocol satisfying our requirements. The model is used both to make our requirements clear by building a model-based prototype before implementation and to verify that the devised protocol is correct. We present techniques to make analysis of the large state-space of the model possible, including modeling techniques and an improved state representation for coloured Petri nets allowing explicit representation of state spaces with more than 10 8 states on a normal PC. We briefly describe our implementation in the process mining tool ProM and how we have used it to improve an existing provider.},
       year = {2011}
    }
  • M. Westergaard, “Better Algorithms for Analyzing and Enacting Declarative Workflow Languages Using LTL,” in Proc. of BPM, Springer-Verlag, 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{improved_translation,
      Author = {M. Westergaard},
      Title = {{Better Algorithms for Analyzing and Enacting Declarative Workflow Languages Using LTL}},
      Year = {2011},
      Publisher = {Springer-Verlag},
      Series = {LNCS}, 
      Booktitle = {{Proc. of BPM}}, 
    }

2010

  • [PDF] M. Montali, M. Pesic, W. M. P. van der Aalst, F. Chesani, P. Mello, and S. Storari, “Declarative specification and verification of service choreographiess,” ACM Trans. Web, vol. 4, pp. 3:1–3:62, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{choreography,
     author = {Montali, Marco and Pesic, Maja and Aalst, Wil M. P. van der and Chesani, Federico and Mello, Paola and Storari, Sergio},
     title = {Declarative specification and verification of service choreographiess},
     journal = {ACM Trans. Web},
     issue_date = {January 2010},
     volume = {4},
     issue = {1},
     month = {January},
     year = {2010},
     issn = {1559-1131},
     pages = {3:1--3:62},
     articleno = {3},
     numpages = {62},
     url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1658373.1658376},
     xdoi = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1658373.1658376},
     acmid = {1658376},
     publisher = {ACM},
     address = {New York, NY, USA},
     keywords = {Service choreographies, abductive logic programming, compliance verification, conformance checking, declarative modeling, interoperability, linear temporal logic, monitoring, reasoning},
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] M. Pesic, H. Schonenberg, and W. Aalst, “Declarative Workflow,” in Modern Business Process Automation, A. H. M. Hofstede, W. M. P. Aalst, M. Adams, and N. Russell, Ed., Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010, pp. 175-201.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{yawlbook_declarative,
       author = {Pesic, Maja and Schonenberg, Helen and Aalst, Wil},
       affiliation = {Eindhoven University of Technology Eindhoven the Netherlands},
       title = {Declarative Workflow},
       booktitle = {Modern Business Process Automation},
       editor = {Hofstede, Arthur H. M. and Aalst, Wil M. P. and Adams, Michael and Russell, Nick},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
       isbn = {978-3-642-03121-2},
       keyword = {Computer Science},
       pages = {175-201},
       doi = {10.1007/978-3-642-03121-2_6},
       note = {10.1007/978-3-642-03121-2_6},
       abstract = {During the design of any information system, it is important to balance between flexibility and support. This is of particular importance when designing process-aware information systems. On the one hand, userswant to have support from the system to conduct their daily activities in a more efficient and effective manner. On the other hand, the same users want to have flexibility, that is, the freedom to do whatever they want and without being  bothered  by the system. Sometimes it is impossible to provide both flexibility and support because of conflicting requirements. The continuous struggle between flexibility and support is illustrated by Fig. 6.1. The right-hand-side of Fig. 6.1 shows the part of the spectrum covered by classical workflow management systems. These systems focus on processes that are repeatedly executed in some predefined manner and are driven by procedural languages. Note that in procedural workflow models there may be alternative paths controlled by (X)OR-splits/joins. However, the basic idea is that the completion of one task triggers other tasks. The YAWL nets described in earlier chapters provide such a procedural language. Although the YAWL language is highly expressive, its token-based semantics is most suitable for repetitive processes with tight control. The left-hand-side of Fig. 6.1 shows the other end of the spectrum. Here processes are less repetitive and the emphasis is on flexibility and user empowerment. Here it is difficult to envision all possible paths and the process is driven by user decisions rather than system decisions. Groupware systems (e.g.,  enhanced  electronic mail, group conferencing systems, etc.) support such processes and focus on supporting human collaboration and co-decision. Groupware systems do not offer supportwhen it comes to ordering and coordination of tasks. Instead, the high degree of flexibility of these systems allows users to control the ordering and coordination of tasks while executing the process (i.e.,  on the fly ).},
       year = {2010}
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] M. Pesic, H. Schonenberg, and W. Aalst, “The Declare Service,” in Modern Business Process Automation, A. H. M. Hofstede, W. M. P. Aalst, M. Adams, and N. Russell, Ed., Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010, pp. 327-343.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{yawlbook_service,
       author = {Pesic, Maja and Schonenberg, Helen and Aalst, Wil},
       affiliation = {Eindhoven University of Technology Eindhoven the Netherlands},
       title = {The Declare Service},
       booktitle = {Modern Business Process Automation},
       editor = {Hofstede, Arthur H. M. and Aalst, Wil M. P. and Adams, Michael and Russell, Nick},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
       isbn = {978-3-642-03121-2},
       keyword = {Computer Science},
       pages = {327-343},
       doi = {10.1007/978-3-642-03121-2_12},
       note = {10.1007/978-3-642-03121-2_12},
       abstract = {The Declare Service is a YAWL Custom Service that enables decomposing YAWL tasks into DECLARE workflows, that is, workflows supported by the workflow management system (WfMS) called DECLARE. The goal of this service is to enable a particular kind of flexibility. Chapter 6 describes a constraint-based approach to workflow models and the ConDec language. This approach, supported by the DECLARE WfMS, allows for more flexibility, that is, execution of tasks is allowed if it is not explicitly forbidden by some constraint. This chapter describes DECLARE and the Declare Service for YAWL. Sometimes it is easier to express a process in a procedural language (e.g., the native workflow language of YAWL) and sometimes a declarative approach is more suitable. Moreover, in a larger process it may be useful to express parts of the process in a procedural language and specify other parts in terms of constraints. Using the service-oriented architecture of YAWL, this can easily be realized. A YAWL task may decompose into a DECLARE process and a task in DECLARE can be decomposed into a YAWL process. Arbitrary decompositions of DECLARE and YAWL models allow for the integration of declarative and YAWL workflows on different abstraction levels.1 This way the designer is not forced to make a binary choice between a declarative and a procedural way of modeling. Hence, a seamless integration can be achieved, where parts of the workflow that need a high degree of flexibility are supported by declarative DECLARE models, and parts of the processes that need centralized control of the system are supported by YAWL models.},
       year = {2010}
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] M. Pešić, D. Bošnački, and W. van der Aalst, “Enacting Declarative Languages Using LTL: Avoiding Errors and Improving Performance,” in Model Checking Software, J. van de Pol and M. Weber, Ed., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2010, vol. 6349, pp. 146-161.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{single_event,
       author = {Pešić, Maja and Bošnački, Dragan and van der Aalst, Wil},
       affiliation = {Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB The Netherlands},
       title = {Enacting Declarative Languages Using LTL: Avoiding Errors and Improving Performance},
       booktitle = {Model Checking Software},
       series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
       editor = {van de Pol, Jaco and Weber, Michael},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
       isbn = {},
       pages = {146-161},
       volume = {6349},
       doi = {10.1007/978-3-642-16164-3_11},
       note = {10.1007/978-3-642-16164-3_11},
       abstract = {In our earlier work we proposed using the declarative language DecSerFlow for modeling, analysis and enactment of processes in autonomous web services. DecSerFlow uses constraints specified with Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) to implicitly define possible executions of a model: any execution that satisfies all constraints is possible. Hence, a finite representation of all possible executions is retrieved as an automaton generated from LTL-based constraints. Standard model-checking algorithms for creating Büchi automata from LTL formulas are not applicable because of the requirements posed by the proper execution of DecSerFlow (and LTL-based process engines). On the one hand, LTL handles infinite words where each element of the word can refer to zero or more propositions. On the other hand, each execution of a DecSerFlow model is a finite sequence of single events. In this paper we adopt an existing approach to finite-word semantics of LTL and propose the modifications of LTL and automata generation algorithm needed to handle occurrences of single events. Besides eliminating errors caused by the ‘multiple properties - single events’ mismatch, the proposed adjustments also improve the performance of the automata generation algorithms dramatically.},
       year = {2010}
    }

2009

  • [PDF] [DOI] W. van der Aalst, M. Pesic, and H. Schonenberg, “Declarative workflows: Balancing between flexibility and support,” Computer Science – Research and Development, vol. 23, pp. 99-113, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{flexibility_support,
       author = {van der Aalst, W. and Pesic, M. and Schonenberg, H.},
       affiliation = {Eindhoven University of Technology P.O. Box 513 5600 MB Eindhoven The Netherlands},
       title = {Declarative workflows: Balancing between flexibility and support},
       journal = {Computer Science - Research and Development},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
       issn = {1865-2034},
       keyword = {Computer Science},
       pages = {99-113},
       volume = {23},
       issue = {2},
       doi = {10.1007/s00450-009-0057-9},
       note = {10.1007/s00450-009-0057-9},
       abstract = {Today’s process-aware information systems tend to either support business processes or provide flexibility. Classical workflow management systems offer good process support as long as the processes are structured and do not require much flexibility. Information systems that allow for flexibility have a tendency to lack process-related support. If systems offer guidance, then they are typically also inclined to ‘‘enforce guidelines’’ and are perceived as inflexible. Moreover, implementing flexible systems is far from trivial. This paper will show that using a more declarative approach can assist in a better balance between flexibility and support. This is demonstrated by presenting the Declare framework that aims to take care of the full spectrum of flexibility while at the same time supports the user using recommendations and other process-mining-based diagnostics.},
       year = {2009}
    }

2008

  • [PDF] [DOI] N. Mulyar, M. Pesic, W. van der Aalst, and M. Peleg, “Declarative and Procedural Approaches for Modelling Clinical Guidelines: Addressing Flexibility Issues,” in Business Process Management Workshops, A. ter Hofstede, B. Benatallah, and H. Paik, Ed., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2008, vol. 4928, pp. 335-346.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{clinical_guidelines,
       author = {Mulyar, Nataliya and Pesic, Maja and van der Aalst, Wil and Peleg, Mor},
       affiliation = {Eindhoven University of Technology GPO Box 513 NL5600 MB Eindhoven The Netherlands},
       title = {Declarative and Procedural Approaches for Modelling Clinical Guidelines: Addressing Flexibility Issues},
       booktitle = {Business Process Management Workshops},
       series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
       editor = {ter Hofstede, Arthur and Benatallah, Boualem and Paik, Hye-Young},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
       isbn = {},
       pages = {335-346},
       volume = {4928},
       doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-78238-4_35},
       note = {10.1007/978-3-540-78238-4_35},
       abstract = {Recent analysis of clinical Computer-Interpretable Guideline (CIG) modelling languages from the perspective of the control-flow patterns has revealed limited capabilities of these languages to provide flexibility for encoding and executing clinical guidelines. The concept of flexibility is of major importance in the medical-care domain since no guarantee can be given on predicting the state of patients at the point of care. In this paper, we illustrate how the flexibility of CIG modelling languages can be improved by describing clinical guidelines using a declarative approach. We propose a CIGDec language for modelling and enacting clinical guidelines.},
       year = {2008}
    }
  • [PDF] M. Pesic, “Constraint-Based Workflow Management Systems: Shifting Control to Users,” PhD Thesis, 2008.
    [Bibtex]
    @phdthesis{maja_thesis,
      author = {M. Pesic},
      title = {{Constraint-Based Workflow Management Systems: Shifting Control to Users}},
      school = {{Eindhoven University of Technology}},
      year = 2008,
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] H. Schonenberg, B. Weber, B. van Dongen, and W. van der Aalst, “Supporting Flexible Processes through Recommendations Based on History,” in Business Process Management, M. Dumas, M. Reichert, and M. Shan, Ed., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2008, vol. 5240, pp. 51-66.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{recommendations,
       author = {Schonenberg, Helen and Weber, Barbara and van Dongen, Boudewijn and van der Aalst, Wil},
       affiliation = {Eindhoven University of Technology Eindhoven The Netherlands},
       title = {Supporting Flexible Processes through Recommendations Based on History},
       booktitle = {Business Process Management},
       series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
       editor = {Dumas, Marlon and Reichert, Manfred and Shan, Ming-Chien},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
       isbn = {},
       pages = {51-66},
       volume = {5240},
       doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-85758-7_7},
       note = {10.1007/978-3-540-85758-7_7},
       abstract = {In today’s fast changing business environment flexible Process Aware Information Systems (PAISs) are required to allow companies to rapidly adjust their business processes to changes in the environment. However, increasing flexibility in large PAISs usually leads to less guidance for its users and consequently requires more experienced users. To allow for flexible systems with a high degree of support, intelligent user assistance is required. In this paper we propose a recommendation service, which, when used in combination with flexible PAISs, can support end users during process execution by giving recommendations on possible next steps. Recommendations are generated based on similar past process executions by considering the specific optimization goals. In this paper we also evaluate the proposed recommendation service, by means of experiments.},
       year = {2008}
    }

2007

  • [PDF] [DOI] W. M. P. van der Aalst and M. Pesic, “Specifying and Monitoring Service Flows: Making Web Services Process-Aware,” in Test and Analysis of Web Services, L. Baresi and E. D. Nitto, Ed., Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007, pp. 11-55.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{web_services,
       author = {Aalst, W.M.P. van der and Pesic, M.},
       affiliation = {Eindhoven University of Technology Department of Technology Management P.O.Box 513 NL-5600 MB Eindhoven The Netherlands},
       title = {Specifying and Monitoring Service Flows: Making Web Services Process-Aware},
       booktitle = {Test and Analysis of Web Services},
       editor = {Baresi, Luciano and Nitto, Elisabetta Di},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
       isbn = {978-3-540-72912-9},
       keyword = {Computer Science},
       pages = {11-55},
       doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-72912-9_2},
       note = {10.1007/978-3-540-72912-9_2},
       abstract = {BPEL has emerged as the de-facto standard for implementing processes based on web services while formal languages like Petri nets have been proposed as an  academic response  allowing for all kinds of analysis. Although languages such as BPEL and Petri nets can be used to describe service flows, they both tend to  overspecify  the process and this does not fit well with the autonomous nature of services. Therefore, we propose DecSerFlow as a Declarative Service Flow Language. By using a more declarative style, there is no need to overspecify service flows. The declarative style also makes DecSerFlow an ideal language for monitoring web services, i.e., using process mining techniques it is possible to check the conformance of service flows by comparing the DecSerFlow specification with reality. This can be used to expose services that do not follow the rules of the game. This is highly relevant given the autonomous nature of services.},
       year = {2007}
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] M. Pesic, M. Schonenberg, N. Sidorova, and W. van der Aalst, “Constraint-Based Workflow Models: Change Made Easy,” in On the Move to Meaningful Internet Systems 2007: CoopIS, DOA, ODBASE, GADA, and IS, R. Meersman and Z. Tari, Ed., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2007, vol. 4803, pp. 77-94.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{change_made_easy,
       author = {Pesic, M. and Schonenberg, M. and Sidorova, N. and van der Aalst, W.},
       affiliation = {Department of Technology Management},
       title = {Constraint-Based Workflow Models: Change Made Easy},
       booktitle = {On the Move to Meaningful Internet Systems 2007: CoopIS, DOA, ODBASE, GADA, and IS},
       series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
       editor = {Meersman, Robert and Tari, Zahir},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
       isbn = {},
       pages = {77-94},
       volume = {4803},
       doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-76848-7_7},
       note = {10.1007/978-3-540-76848-7_7},
       abstract = {The degree of flexibility of workflow management systems heavily influences the way business processes are executed. Constraint-based models are considered to be more flexible than traditional models because of their semantics: everything that does not violate constraints is allowed. Although constraint-based models are flexible, changes to process definitions might be needed to comply with evolving business domains and exceptional situations. Flexibility can be increased by run-time support for dynamic changes – transferring instances to a new model – and ad-hoc changes – changing the process definition for one instance. In this paper we propose a general framework for a constraint-based process modeling language and its implementation. Our approach supports both ad-hoc and dynamic change, and the transfer of instances can be done easier than in traditional approaches.},
       year = {2007}
    }
  • [PDF] M. Pesic, H. Schonenberg, and W. M. P. van der Aalst, “DECLARE: Full Support for Loosely-Structured Processes,” in Proceedings of the 11th IEEE International Enterprise Distributed Object Computing Conference, Washington, DC, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2007, pp. 287–.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{full_support,
     author = {Pesic, M. and Schonenberg, H. and van der Aalst, W.M.P.},
     title = {{DECLARE: Full Support for Loosely-Structured Processes}},
     booktitle = {Proceedings of the 11th IEEE International Enterprise Distributed Object Computing Conference},
     year = {2007},
     isbn = {0-7695-2891-0},
     pages = {287--},
     url = {http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1317532.1318056},
     acmid = {1318056},
     publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
     address = {Washington, DC, USA},
    }

2006

  • [PDF] W. van der Aalst and M. Pesic, “DecSerFlow: Towards a Truly Declarative Service Flow Language,” in The Role of Business Processes in Service Oriented Architectures, Dagstuhl, Germany, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @InProceedings{decserflow_dagstuhl,
      author =  {Wil van der Aalst and Maja Pesic},
      title =  {DecSerFlow: Towards a Truly Declarative Service Flow Language},
      booktitle =  {The Role of Business Processes in Service Oriented Architectures},
      year =  {2006},
      editor =  {Frank Leymann and Wolfgang Reisig and Satish R. Thatte and Wil van der Aalst},
      number =  {06291},
      series =  {Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings},
      ISSN =  {1862-4405},
      publisher =  {Internationales Begegnungs- und Forschungszentrum f{\"u}r Informatik (IBFI), Schloss Dagstuhl, Germany},
      address =  {Dagstuhl, Germany},
      URL =    {http://drops.dagstuhl.de/opus/volltexte/2006/829},
      annote =  {Keywords: DecSerFlow, LTL, service flows, web services, SOA}
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] W. van der Aalst and M. Pesic, “DecSerFlow: Towards a Truly Declarative Service Flow Language,” in Web Services and Formal Methods, M. Bravetti, M. Núñez, and G. Zavattaro, Ed., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2006, vol. 4184, pp. 1-23.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{decserflow,
       author = {van der Aalst, W. and Pesic, M.},
       affiliation = {Department of Information Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands},
       title = {DecSerFlow: Towards a Truly Declarative Service Flow Language},
       booktitle = {Web Services and Formal Methods},
       series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
       editor = {Bravetti, Mario and Núñez, Manuel and Zavattaro, Gianluigi},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
       isbn = {},
       pages = {1-23},
       volume = {4184},
       doi = {10.1007/11841197_1},
       note = {10.1007/11841197_1},
       abstract = {The need for process support in the context of web services has triggered the development of many languages, systems, and standards. Industry has been developing software solutions and proposing standards such as BPEL, while researchers have been advocating the use of formal methods such as Petri nets and π-calculus. The languages developed for service flows, i.e., process specification languages for web services, have adopted many concepts from classical workflow management systems. As a result, these languages are rather procedural and this does not fit well with the autonomous nature of services. Therefore, we propose DecSerFlow as a Declarative Service Flow Language. DecSerFlow can be used to specify, enact, and monitor service flows. The language is extendible (i.e., constructs can be added without changing the engine or semantical basis) and can be used to enforce or to check the conformance of service flows. Although the language has an appealing graphical representation, it is grounded in temporal logic.},
       year = {2006}
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] M. Pesic and W. van der Aalst, “A Declarative Approach for Flexible Business Processes Management,” in Business Process Management Workshops, J. Eder and S. Dustdar, Ed., Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2006, vol. 4103, pp. 169-180.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{declarative_approach,
       author = {Pesic, M. and van der Aalst, W.},
       affiliation = {Department of Technology Management, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O.Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands},
       title = {A Declarative Approach for Flexible Business Processes Management},
       booktitle = {Business Process Management Workshops},
       series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
       editor = {Eder, Johann and Dustdar, Schahram},
       publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
       isbn = {},
       pages = {169-180},
       volume = {4103},
       doi = {10.1007/11837862_18},
       note = {10.1007/11837862_18},
       abstract = {Management of dynamic processes in an important issue in rapidly changing organizations. Workflow management systems are systems that use detailed process models to drive the business processes. Current business process modelling languages and models are of imperative nature – they strictly prescribe how to work. Systems that allow users to maneuver within the process model or even change the model while working are considered to be the most suitable for dynamic processes management. However, in many companies it is not realistic to expect that end-users are able to change their processes. Moreover, the imperative nature of these languages forces designer to over-specify processes, which results in frequent changes. We propose a fundamental paradigm shift for flexible process management and propose a more declarative approach. Declarative models specify what should be done without specifying how it should be done. We propose the ConDec language for modelling and enacting dynamic business processes. ConDec is based on temporal logic rather than some imperative process modelling language.},
       year = {2006}
    }

Presentations

WS-FM 2006.

DecSerFlow: Towards a Truly Declarative Service Flow Language (ppt)

Eedoc 2007.

DECLARE: Full Support for Loosely-Structured Processes

CoopIS 2007.

Constraint-Based Workflow Models: Change Made Easy! (ppt)