Publications 2006

  • [PDF] W. M. P. van der Aalst, M. Dumas, C. Ouyang, A. Rozinat, and H. M. W. Verbeek, “Choreography conformance checking: an approach based on bpel and petri nets (revised version),” BPMcenter.org, BPM Center Report BPM-06-31, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @TechReport{Aalst06,
    Title = {Choreography Conformance Checking: An Approach based on BPEL and Petri Nets (Revised version)},
    Author = {Aalst, W. M. P. van der and Dumas, M. and Ouyang, C. and Rozinat, A. and Verbeek, H. M. W.},
    Institution = {BPMcenter.org},
    Year = {2006},
    Number = {BPM-06-31},
    Type = {BPM Center Report},
    Abstract = {A service-oriented system is composed of independent software units, namely services, that interact with one another exclusively through message exchanges. The proper functioning of such system depends on whether or not each individual service behaves as the other services expect it to behave. Since services may be developed and operated independently, it is unrealistic to assume that this is always the case. This paper addresses the problem of checking and quantifying how much the actual behavior of a service, as recorded in message logs, conforms to the expected behavior as specified in some process model. Concretely, we consider the case where the expected behavior is defined using the de-facto industry standard BPEL (i.e., the Business Process Execution Language for Web Services). BPEL process definitions are translated into Petri nets and Petri net-based conformance checking techniques are applied to quantify two complementary indicators of conformance: fitness and appropriateness. The approach is supported by ProM (a toolset for business process analysis and mining) and has been applied in a setting using multiple Oracle BPEL servers.},
    File = {BPM Center:http\://www.bpmcenter.org/:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Aalst06.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://bpmcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/reports/2006/BPM-06-31.pdf}
    }
  • W. M. P. van der Aalst, J. Mendling, B. F. van Dongen, and H. M. W. Verbeek, Fouten in sap-referentiemodel, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @Misc{Aalst06a,
    Title = {Fouten in SAP-referentiemodel},
    Author = {Aalst, W. M. P. van der and Mendling, J. and Dongen, B. F. van and Verbeek, H. M. W.},
    HowPublished = {Automatiseringsgids},
    Month = {May},
    Note = {in Dutch},
    Year = {2006},
    Abstract = {Onderzoek leert dat er in het SAP R/3-referentiemodel veel fouten zitten. Een zorgwekkende situatie, stellen de auteurs van dit artikel, omdat het model wordt gebruikt voor ondermeer trainingsdoeleinden, systeemselectie en procesverbetering. Fouten in modellen leiden tot falende systemen.},
    File = {Automatiseringsgids:http\://www.automatiseringsgids.nl/:URL},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://www.automatiseringgids.nl/achtergrond/2006/20/fouten-in-sap-referentiemodel}
    }
  • [PDF] P. Barborka, L. Helm, G. Koldorfer, J. Mendling, G. Neumann, H. M. W. Verbeek, B. F. van Dongen, and W. M. P. van der Aalst, “Integration of epc-related tools with prom,” in Proceedings of fifth workshop on event-driven process chains (wi-epk 2006), Vienna, Austria, 2006, pp. 105-120.
    [Bibtex]
    @InProceedings{Barborka06,
    Title = {Integration of EPC-related Tools with ProM},
    Author = {Barborka, P. and Helm, L. and Koldorfer, G. and Mendling, J. and Neumann, G. and Verbeek, H. M. W. and Dongen, B. F. van and Aalst, W. M. P. van der},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings of Fifth Workshop on Event-Driven Process Chains (WI-EPK 2006)},
    Year = {2006},
    Address = {Vienna, Austria},
    Editor = {Nüttgens, M. and Rump, F. J. and Mendling, J.},
    Month = {December},
    Pages = {105--120},
    Publisher = {Gesellschaft fuer Informatik, Bonn},
    Abstract = {The heterogeneity of different formats for EPCs is a major problem for model interchange between specialized tools in practice. In this paper, we compare three different formats for storing EPCs, in particular, the proprietary formats of Microsoft Visio and ARIS Toolset as well as the tool-independent EPML format. Furthermore, we introduce the ProM framework and show using the case of a sales process model expressed in terms of an EPC that ProM is able to serve as a mediator between these formats. Beyond that, we demonstrate that the ProM framework can be used for the analysis of EPCs and to translate EPCs into YAWL models for execution or for further analysis.},
    File = {EPK 2006:http\://epk.et-inf.fho-emden.de/epk2006/:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Barborka06.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Barborka06.pdf}
    }
  • [PDF] B. F. van Dongen, J. van Luin, and H. M. W. Verbeek, “Process mining in a multi-agent auctioning system,” in Fourth international workshop on modelling of objects, components, and agents, moca 2006, Turku, Finland, 2006, pp. 145-160.
    [Bibtex]
    @InProceedings{Dongen06,
    Title = {Process Mining in a Multi-Agent Auctioning System},
    Author = {Dongen, B. F. van and Luin, J. van and Verbeek, H. M. W.},
    Booktitle = {Fourth International Workshop on Modelling of Objects, Components, and Agents, MOCA 2006},
    Year = {2006},
    Address = {Turku, Finland},
    Editor = {Moldt, D.},
    Month = {June},
    Note = {FBI-HH-B-272/06},
    Pages = {145--160},
    Publisher = {Department of Computer Science, University of Hamburg},
    Series = {Bericht},
    Volume = {272},
    Abstract = {Both process mining and multi agent simulations are relatively new research areas, both evolving rapidly. In multi agent simulations, techniques are being developed to make agents more intelligent and more adaptive to their environment. In process mining, the focus has shifted from discovering a complete process model from an execution log, to the development of all kind of analysis techniques related to processes. In this paper, we combine the two research areas by showing that process mining techniques, applied to the communication logs of multi-agent simulations, can help in understanding the behaviour of agents. Furthermore, we show that process mining could actually help agents to adapt to their environment, by enabling them to discover why another agent makes certain decisions instead of just discovering that it made a decision.},
    File = {MOCA 2006:http\://www.informatik.uni-hamburg.de/TGI/events/moca06/:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Dongen06.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Dongen06.pdf}
    }
  • [PDF] F. Gottschalk, W. M. P. van der Aalst, M. H. Jansen-Vullers, and H. M. W. Verbeek, “Protos2cpn: using colored petri nets for configuring and testing business processes,” in Proceedings of the seventh workshop on the practical use of coloured petri nets and cpn tools (cpn 2006), Aarhus, Denmark, 2006, pp. 137-156.
    [Bibtex]
    @InProceedings{Gottschalk06,
    Title = {Protos2CPN: Using Colored Petri Nets for Configuring and Testing Business Processes},
    Author = {Gottschalk, F. and Aalst, W. M. P. van der and Jansen-Vullers, M. H. and Verbeek, H. M. W.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings of the Seventh Workshop on the Practical Use of Coloured Petri Nets and CPN Tools (CPN 2006)},
    Year = {2006},
    Address = {Aarhus, Denmark},
    Editor = {Jensen, K.},
    Month = {October},
    Pages = {137--156},
    Publisher = {University of Aarhus},
    Series = {DAIMI},
    Volume = {579},
    Abstract = {Protos is a popular tool for business process modelling used in more than 1500 organizations. It has a built-in Petri-net-based simulation engine which shows key performance indicators for the modelled processes. Reference process models offered for Protos reduce modelling efforts by providing generic solutions which only need to be adapted to individual requirements. However, the user can neither inspect or interact with simulations running in Protos, nor does Protos provide any explicit support for the adaptation of reference models. Hence, we aim at a more open and configurable simulation solution. To realize this we provide two transformations from Protos models to colored Petri nets (CPNs), which can be executed by CPN Tools. The first transformation enables the usage of the extensive simulation and measuring features of CPN Tools for the simulation of Protos models. The second transformation creates colored Petri nets with dedicated features for process configuration. Such configurable process models can be restricted directly within the process model without changing the model’s structure and provide therefore dedicated adaptation features for Protos’ reference process models.},
    File = {Protos:http\://www.pallas-athena.nl/:URL;CPN 2006:http\://www.daimi.au.dk/CPnets/workshop06/:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Gottschalk06.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Gottschalk06.pdf}
    }
  • [PDF] J. Mendling, W. M. P. van der Aalst, B. F. van Dongen, and H. M. W. Verbeek, “Errors in the sap reference model,” , 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @Electronic{Mendling06,
    Title = {Errors in the SAP Reference Model},
    Author = {Mendling, J. and Aalst, W. M. P. van der and Dongen, B. F. van and Verbeek, H. M. W.},
    Language = {English},
    Month = {June},
    Organization = {BPTrends},
    Url = {http://www.bptrends.com/deliver_file.cfm?fileType=publication&fileName=06%2D06%2DWP%2DErrorsInSAPRefModel%2DMendling%2Detal%2Epdf},
    Year = {2006},
    Abstract = {The SAP Reference Model is a set of information models that is utilized to guide the configuration of SAP systems. A big part of these models are business process models represented in the Eventdriven Process Chains (EPC) notation. These EPC models provide a easy to comprehend overview of SAP business functionality on an abstract level. As such, the SAP Reference Model is considered as an important tool to bridge the gap between business logic and information system implementation. In a recent research project, we found that there are several errors in the reference model: 5.6% of the more than 600 processes that we analyzed revealed errors.},
    File = {Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Mendling06.pdf:URL;BPTrends:http\://www.bptrends.com/:URL},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04}
    }
  • J. Mendling, W. M. P. van der Aalst, B. F. van Dongen, and H. M. W. Verbeek, Referenzmodell: sand im getriebe – webfehler, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @Misc{Mendling06a,
    Title = {Referenzmodell: Sand im Getriebe - Webfehler},
    Author = {Mendling, J. and Aalst, W. M. P. van der and Dongen, B. F. van and Verbeek, H. M. W.},
    HowPublished = {iX - Magazin für Professionelle Informationstechnik},
    Month = {August},
    Note = {in German},
    Year = {2006},
    Abstract = {Referenzmodelle erleichtern die Einführung und die Anpassung komplexer Softwaresysteme. Dazu sollten sie selbst fehlerfrei sein. SAPs Referenzmodell enthält trotzdem einige Unstimmigkeiten.},
    File = {iX:http\://www.heise.de/ix/:URL},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://www.heise.de/kiosk/archiv/ix/2006/8/131}
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] J. Mendling, M. Moser, G. Neumann, H. M. W. Verbeek, B. F. van Dongen, and W. M. P. van der Aalst, “Faulty epcs in the sap reference model,” in Business process management, bpm 2006, Vienna, Austria, 2006, pp. 451-457.
    [Bibtex]
    @InProceedings{Mendling06b,
    Title = {Faulty EPCs in the SAP Reference Model},
    Author = {Mendling, J. and Moser, M. and Neumann, G. and Verbeek, H. M. W. and Dongen, B. F. van and Aalst, W. M. P. van der},
    Booktitle = {Business Process Management, BPM 2006},
    Year = {2006},
    Address = {Vienna, Austria},
    Editor = {Dustdar, S. and Fiadeiro, J. and Sheth, A. P.},
    Month = {September},
    Pages = {451--457},
    Publisher = {Springer, Berlin, Germany},
    Series = {Lecture Notes in computer Science},
    Volume = {4102},
    Abstract = {Little is known about error probability in enterprise models as they are usually kept private. The SAP reference model is a publically available model that contains more than 600 non-trivial process models expressed in terms of Event-driven Process Chains (EPCs). We have automatically translated these EPCs into YAWL models and analyzed these models using WofYAWL, a verification tool based on Petri nets, in order to acquire knowledge about errors in large enterprise models. We discovered that at least 34 of these EPCs contain errors (i.e., at least 5.6% is flawed) and analyzed which parts of the SAP reference model contain most errors. This systematic analysis of the SAP reference model illustrates the need for verification tools such as WofYAWL.},
    Doi = {10.1007/11841760_38},
    File = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science:http\://link.springer.de/link/service/series/0558/index.htm:URL;Volume 4102:http\://www.springerlink.com/content/978-3-540-38901-9/:URL;4th International Conference on Business Process Management, BPM 2006:http\://bpm2006.tuwien.ac.at/:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Mendling06b.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/w264710n6j35580h/fulltext.pdf}
    }
  • [PDF] J. Mendling, M. Moser, G. Neumann, H. M. W. Verbeek, B. F. van Dongen, and W. M. P. van der Aalst, “A quantitative analysis of faulty epcs in the sap reference model,” BPMcenter.org, BPM Center Report BPM-06-08, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @TechReport{Mendling06c,
    Title = {A Quantitative Analysis of Faulty EPCs in the SAP Reference Model},
    Author = {Mendling, J. and Moser, M. and Neumann, G. and Verbeek, H. M. W. and Dongen, B. F. van and Aalst, W. M. P. van der},
    Institution = {BPMcenter.org},
    Year = {2006},
    Number = {BPM-06-08},
    Type = {BPM Center Report},
    Abstract = {The SAP reference model contains more than 600 non-trivial process models expressed in terms of Event-driven Process Chains (EPCs). We have automatically translated these EPCs into YAWL models and analyzed these models usingWofYAWL, a verification tool based on Petri nets. We discovered that at least 34 of these EPCs contain errors (i.e., at least 5.6% is flawed). We analyzed which parts of the SAP reference model contain most errors. Moreover, based on 15 characteristics (e.g., the size of the model), we used logistic regression to find possible predictors for these errors. This systematic analysis of the SAP reference model illustrates the need for verification tools such as WofYAWL.},
    File = {BPM Center:http\://www.bpmcenter.org/:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Mendling06c.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://bpmcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/reports/2006/BPM-06-08.pdf}
    }
  • [PDF] H. M. W. Verbeek and W. M. P. van der Aalst, “On the verification of epcs using t-invariants,” BPMcenter.org, BPM Center Report BPM-06-05, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @TechReport{Verbeek06,
    Title = {On the verification of EPCs using T-invariants},
    Author = {Verbeek, H. M. W. and Aalst, W. M. P. van der},
    Institution = {BPMcenter.org},
    Year = {2006},
    Number = {BPM-06-05},
    Type = {BPM Center Report},
    Abstract = {To verify a (business) process model, for example expressed in terms of an Event-driven Process Chain (EPC), most of the approaches described in literature require the construction of its state space. Unfortunately, for complex business processes the state space can be extremely large (if at all finite) and, as a result, constructing the state space may require excessive time. Moreover, semi-formal modeling languages such as the EPC language require a rather lenient interpretation of their semantics. To circumvent both the state-explosion problem and the semantics-related problems of EPCs, we propose an alternative approach based on transition invariants (T-invariants). T-invariants are well-known in the Petri-net community. They do not require the construction of the state space and can be computed efficiently. Moreover, we will show that our interpretation of T-invariants in this context can be used to deal effectively with the semantics-related problems of EPCs. To demonstrate our approach we will use two case studies: one is based on the reference model of SAP R/3 while the other one is based on a trade execution process within a large Dutch bank. We will also argue that the approach can be applied to other (informal or formal) modeling techniques.},
    File = {BPM Center:http\://www.bpmcenter.org/:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Verbeek06.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://bpmcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/reports/2006/BPM-06-05.pdf}
    }
  • [PDF] H. M. W. Verbeek, W. M. P. van der Aalst, and A. H. M. ter Hofstede, “Verifying workflows with cancellation regions and or-joins: an approach based on invariants,” Eindhoven University of Technology, BETA Working Paper 156, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @TechReport{Verbeek06a,
    Title = {Verifying Workflows with Cancellation Regions and OR-joins: An Approach Based on Invariants},
    Author = {Verbeek, H. M. W. and Aalst, W. M. P. van der and Hofstede, A. H. M. ter},
    Institution = {Eindhoven University of Technology},
    Year = {2006},
    Month = {January},
    Number = {156},
    Type = {BETA Working Paper},
    Abstract = {The YAWL (Yet Another Workflow Language) workflow language supports the most frequent control-flow patterns found in the current workflow practice. As a result, most workflow languages can be mapped onto YAWL without loss of control-flow details, even languages allowing for advanced constructs such as cancellation regions and OR-joins. At the moment no analysis techniques are available for such languages, because both cancellation regions and OR-joins are “non-local” properties and therefore difficult to verify. Hence, a verification approach for YAWL is desirable, because such an approach could be used for any workflow language that can be mapped onto YAWL. This paper introduces a verification approach for YAWL that abstracts from the actual semantics of the OR-join. This approach is correct (errors reported are really errors), but not necessarily complete (not every error might get reported). This incompleteness is due to the fact that the approach approximates the OR-join semantics. Nevertheless, our approach can be used to successfully detect errors in YAWL models. Moreover, the approach can easily be transferred to other workflow languages allowing for advanced constructs such as cancellations and OR-joins.},
    File = {BETA Working Paper Series:http\://www.tm.tue.nl/beta/publications/window.htm:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Verbeek06a.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://beta.ieis.tue.nl/node/1264}
    }
  • [PDF] H. M. W. Verbeek, B. F. van Dongen, J. Mendling, and W. M. P. van der Aalst, “Interoperability in the prom framework,” in Proceedings of the caise06 workshops and doctoral consortium, Luxembourg, 2006, pp. 619-630.
    [Bibtex]
    @InProceedings{Verbeek06b,
    Title = {Interoperability in the ProM Framework},
    Author = {Verbeek, H. M. W. and Dongen, B. F. van and Mendling, J. and Aalst, W. M. P. van der},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings of the CAiSE’06 Workshops and Doctoral Consortium},
    Year = {2006},
    Address = {Luxembourg},
    Editor = {Latour, T. and Petit, M.},
    Month = {June},
    Pages = {619--630},
    Publisher = {Presses Universitaires de Namur},
    Abstract = {Originally the ProM framework was developed as a design artifact for the process mining domain, i.e., extracting process models from event logs. However, in recent years the scope of the framework has become broader and now includes process verification, social network analysis, conformance checking, verification based on temporal logic, etc. Moreover, the framework supports a wide variety of process models, e.g., Petri nets, Event-driven Process Chains (EPCs), Heuristics nets, YAWL models, and is plug-able, i.e., people can add plug-ins without changing the framework itself. This makes the ProM framework an interesting environment for model interoperability. For example, people can take transaction log from IBM’s WebSphere, discover a process model in terms of a heuristics net, convert the heuristics net to a Petri net for analysis, load an EPC defined using the ARIS toolset, verify the EPC and convert it to a Petri net, determine the fitness of the ARIS model given the transaction log from WebSphere, and finally convert both models to a YAWL specification that is exported. Such application scenarios are supported by ProM and demonstrate true model interoperability. In this paper, we present ProM’s interoperability capabilities using a running example.},
    File = {EMOI 2006 CfP:http\://leks-pub.iasi.cnr.it/EMOI06/EMOI06CFP.html:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Verbeek06b.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Verbeek06b.pdf}
    }
  • [PDF] M. T. Wynn, H. M. W. Verbeek, W. M. P. van der Aalst, A. H. M. ter Hofstede, and D. Edmond, “Reduction rules for reset workflow nets,” BPMcenter.org, BPM Center Report BPM-06-25, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @TechReport{Wynn06,
    Title = {Reduction rules for Reset Workflow Nets},
    Author = {Wynn, M. T. and Verbeek, H. M. W. and Aalst, W. M. P. van der and Hofstede, A. H. M. ter and Edmond, D.},
    Institution = {BPMcenter.org},
    Year = {2006},
    Number = {BPM-06-25},
    Type = {BPM Center Report},
    Abstract = {When a workflow contains a large number of tasks and involves complex control flow dependencies, verification can take too much time or it may even be impossible. Reduction rules can be used to abstract from certain transitions and places in a large net and thus could cut down the size of the net used for verification. Petri nets have been proposed to model and analyse workflows and Petri nets reduction rules have been used for efficient verification of various properties of workflows, such as liveness and boundedness. Reset nets are Petri nets with reset arcs, which can remove tokens from places when a transition fires. The nature of reset arcs closely relates to the cancellation behaviour in work- flows. As a result, reset nets have been proposed to formally represent workflows with cancellation behaviour, which is not easily modelled in ordinary Petri nets. Even though reduction rules exist for Petri nets, the nature of reset arcs could invalidate the transformation rules applicable to Petri nets. This motivated us to consider possible reduction rules for reset nets. In this paper, we propose a number of reduction rules for Reset Workflow Nets (RWF-nets) that are soundness preserving. These reduction rules are based on reduction rules available for Petri nets [19] and we present the necessary conditions under which these rules hold in the context of reset nets.},
    File = {BPM Center:http\://www.bpmcenter.org/:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Wynn06.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://bpmcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/reports/2006/BPM-06-25.pdf}
    }
  • [PDF] M. T. Wynn, H. M. W. Verbeek, W. M. P. van der Aalst, A. H. M. ter Hofstede, and D. Edmond, “Reduction rules for yawl workflow nets with cancellation regions and or-joins,” BPMcenter.org, BPM Center Report BPM-06-24, 2006.
    [Bibtex]
    @TechReport{Wynn06a,
    Title = {Reduction Rules for YAWL Workflow Nets with Cancellation Regions and OR-joins},
    Author = {Wynn, M. T. and Verbeek, H. M. W. and Aalst, W. M. P. van der and Hofstede, A. H. M. ter and Edmond, D.},
    Institution = {BPMcenter.org},
    Year = {2006},
    Number = {BPM-06-24},
    Type = {BPM Center Report},
    Abstract = {A reduction rule can transform a large net into a smaller and simple net while preserving certain interesting properties and it is usually applied before verification to reduce the complexity and to prevent state space explosion. Reset nets have been proposed to formally describe workflows with cancellation behaviour. In our previous work, we have presented a set of reduction rules for Reset Workflow Net (RWF-net), which is a subclass of reset nets. In this paper, we will present a set of reduction rules for YAWL nets with cancellation regions and OR-joins. The reduction rules for RWF-nets combined with the formal mappings from YAWL nets provide us with the means to define a set of reduction rules for YAWL nets. We will also demonstrate how these reduction rules can be used for efficient verification of YAWL nets these features.},
    File = {BPM Center:http\://www.bpmcenter.org/:URL;Preprint of published paper:http\://www.win.tue.nl/~hverbeek/downloads/preprints/Wynn06a.pdf:PDF},
    Owner = {hverbeek},
    Timestamp = {2008.11.04},
    Url = {http://bpmcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/reports/2006/BPM-06-24.pdf}
    }

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